Learn to Relax and Have Fun Playtime Outdoors

Connect with nature and get your regular dose of natural stress relief while you’re at it! This we should memorize as a daily mantra.

I talk a lot about getting outdoors to move, do your exercise and have fun while you are at it. Most of us don’t follow my advice, sometimes (because of work); I don’t follow my own advice. But I try damn hard to, because I know how much better it makes me feel.

Leading a healthy lifestyle is not just about eating healthy food (if you know what that is) and working out all the time. It’s about being aware of your life and moments throughout your day, and it’s about taking time for you, relaxing, doing fun things alone or with family and friends. The more time you spend focusing on your inner well being and the more you look after you, the better you are going to feel. This will result in a more “productive you” at work and a more “fun you” to be around. People who don’t get out, just stare at a screen all day and night, nor make an effort on weekends to break the mould and do something different, are mostly bitter people who think they have all the cards stacked against them and things are unfair. Well, they don’t at all; they stack them that way with their own self-destructive behaviour. Get out and make an effort!

As a Health Coach with my own story of recovery from depression and being overweight, I can really attest to this being a major factor in the process of getting well again and finding that healthy lifestyle, for real.

Many of us think we are healthy, maybe because you hit the gym every day, or think you eat loads of salad. Not so fast, too much hard exercise actually harms your overall health and well being. What we need is a good dose of balance with everything we do.

But first we need to draw up a menu of everything we “should” be doing and check it daily and weekly to make sure are doing it right.

That menu should include:

Eat well (and I mean follow the keto diet to become ketogenic). This will in itself become a lifestyle habit for you that you will not want to break. Once you learn how to achieve this and get there, it’s the most amazing feeling.
Workouts and Fitness Routines need to be carefully coordinated so that you do not over exercise, as so many people do everyday worldwide. Your whole body fitness program may need a total adjustment.
Set up an “efficient” cardio and weight training program, but do not over exercise.
Schedule alone time in your calendar for reading and meditating.
Schedule Play and Fun time alone or with friends and family.
Make sure you breath take note of what’s going on during your day while you are living it, or you may just miss it and become automated. This is MINDFULNESS; we need to adopt a mindful mind. This will help you take more enjoyment out of any given situation and deal with difficult ones more effectively.

That said, as a Health and Fitness Coach this is how I spend my weekend beach time, because I just don’t like to sit still for too long. After 30 minutes of sunbathing and reading I get antsy, so I decided to have some fun and create a simple and fun beach workout. Nothing much to it, but it will keep you true to your primal health coaching program movement plan for the day and you will have fun while at it. You could just go for a swim, but that would be boring…

Move intuitively and be creative. Take any and every opportunity you come across for this type of thing. Believe me, these moments happen a lot but are often lost as we are too busy thinking about what’s next.

Over-The-Counter Drug – Need to Know Its Benefits and Detriment

The OTC drug market has grown rapidly over the past few years. Thanks to the major players in the market, such as Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi, and GSK, focusing on OTC drug development and the conversion of prescription to OTC, the other market players have also been influenced. The diversity of pharmaceutical companies focusing on OTC has helped the market flourish with a faster growth rate.

Nevertheless, there are still many issues that hinder the market’s growth. Many safety problems are inherent to OTC drug purchase. With increasing safety issues, the government has tightened the rules to control purchase.

Time- and Money-saving
As of 2012, there are over 300,000 OTC drugs in the market, and according to the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA), annually a total of 2.9 billion retail tips purchase OTC products. These drugs help the patients in saving time that is spent on doctor visits and diagnostics test for minor ailments. Also, this saves money for the consumers, which is needed to visit a physician and on prescription.

Cost-saving by Healthcare Systems
OTC medications reduce the necessity to visit the doctor/physician. This saves resources for the healthcare industry in particular, thereby allowing it to divert its resources to more pressing healthcare issues, which would require physician involvement, such as diagnosis and treatment procedures for serious conditions. OTC medicines provide access to safe medication for nearly 180 million patients, while, at the same time, saving capital for the healthcare industry. Self-care via these medications is estimated to contribute to savings as high as USD 5 billion to the taxpayers and consumers in the United States annually. As per CHPA, OTC medication saves around USD 102 billion for the US healthcare system annually.

Self-Control over Health
The OTC medications provide the liberty to patients to eliminate the need to visit a physician or other clinical setting for common ailments. Instead, they can easily procure medications to address their ailment by procuring drugs without a prescription. According to the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, around 81% of the adult population is using OTC medications. It is being helpful in providing symptomatic relief to around 60 million people. The statistics show that the consumers are aware of their health conditions and are paying attention to the treatment. OTC medication helps people meet healthcare needs and empower individuals about health management.

Product Innovation
OTC drugs that can treat multiple symptoms are another example of innovative products. Innovation is also resulting in improved performance, in terms of speed, strength, etc., thus improving the length of the effect. The diversification of the product is also achieved, as targeting different age groups – children, adults, woman, and old people with different products – are emerging and will drive the OTC drug market in future. The manufacturers of OTC target the women group, resorting to angles like pregnancy, weight loss, and even self-expression, which leads to new innovations. Similarly, OTC brands target children groups, with innovative offerings that consider two key drivers: enhancing the fun look and feel, and making it easier for parents to administer the dose to their kids.

Teen Drug Abuse
According to available statistics, around 12% of teenagers have admitted having abused OTC cough syrup. The major abuse of cough-and-cold medicines is seen among the teen population. Other medications include the usage of pseudoephedrine, marijuana, and diet pills. The major reason behind OTC abuse is the lack of education in teens about the dangers associated with OTC drugs. The parents are not well-educated about the adverse effects of OTC drugs, nor do they show interest to take the advice of physicians on this. This ultimately leads to hazardous casualties that can affect health or even lead to death.

Usage among the Geriatric Population
According to statistics, 40% of the OTC drugs are used by the geriatric population of age 65 and above. The geriatric population suffers from one or more diseases and are always on multiple medications. Sometimes, the OTC drugs purchased can cause the risk of drug interactions, leading to adverse drug effects. Other OTC medications, such as motion sickness pills and painkillers, that are commonly used by the elders cause hallucinations, stomach, and kidney problems, which can be considered as dangerous side effects for the geriatric population.

Usage in the Pregnant Population
Most of OTC drug labels carry the precaution about whether it can be used by pregnant women or not. However, due to negligence, people tend to use OTC drugs without proper knowledge, which may lead to life-threating situations. OTC drugs, such as Aspirin and Ibuprofen, should be avoided during the pregnancy, as they have shown adverse effects on unborn children or complications during delivery.

OTC Drugs through the Internet
With the development of the internet technology, medicines are now available at the doors. Sexual performance medicines are one of the products that are sold through the internet at a high rate. These medicines are used on over-dosages and are usually taken along with the alcohol. Research shows that sexual medicines have a reverse effect on sexual performance, when taken in combination with alcohol and can cause major heart problems.

Is Team Training Effective at Healthcare Sites?

In the June 2016 issue of the Journal of Applied Psychology the authors Eduardo Salas, Lauren Benishek, Megan Gregory and Ashley Hughes in an article titled “Saving Lives: A Meta-Analysis of Team Training in Healthcare” set out to answer the question as to whether team training is effective in healthcare, whether it leads to reduced mortality and improved health outcomes.

Their research stated that a preventable medical error occurs in one in every three hospital admissions and results in 98,000 deaths per year, a figure corroborated in To Err is Human. Teamwork errors through failure in communications accounts for 68.3% of these errors. Thus, effective team training is necessary to reduce errors in hospitals and ambulatory sites.

The authors used a meta-analysis research method to determine whether there are effective training methods in the healthcare setting that can have a significant impact on medical errors, which would in turn improve outcomes and reduce costs by eliminating the costs associated with the errors. A meta-analysis is a broad research of existing literature to answer the research questions posed by the research team or authors.

The research team posed three questions to answer:

1. Is team training in healthcare effective?

2. Under what conditions is healthcare team training effective?

3. How does healthcare team training influence bottom-line organizational outcomes and patient outcomes?

The team limited its meta-analysis to healthcare teams even though there is a great deal of research available about the effectiveness of team training in other industries and service organizations. The team believes that healthcare teams differ significantly from teams in other areas in as much that there can be much greater team fluidity in healthcare. That is, team membership is not always static, especially at sites such as hospitals and outpatient surgical centers. There are more handoffs at these sites.

Although there is greater fluidity in team membership at healthcare sites, roles are well defined. For instance, a medical assistant’s role at a primary care site is well defined even though different MA’s may be working with one physician. These roles are further defined and limited by state licensure. As the research team stated in their article, “these features make healthcare team training a unique form of training that is likely to be developed and implemented differently than training in more traditional teams… ”

The team assessed their research of articles using Kirkpatrick’s model of training effectiveness, a widely used framework to evaluate team training. It consists of four areas of evaluation:

1. Trainee reactions

2. Learning

3. Transfer

4. Results

Reaction is the extent to which the trainee finds the instruction useful or the extent to which he enjoys it. Learning is defined as a relatively permanent change in knowledge, skills and abilities. The authors note that team training is not a hard skill, as learning to draw blood. Rather, it is a soft knowledge skill. Some researchers question whether it is possible to measure the acquisition of these soft team skills effectively. The team of authors effectively argue that it can.

Transfer is the use of trained knowledge, skills and abilities at the work site. That is, can team training be effectively applied in the work setting? Results are the impacts of the training on patient health, the reduction of medical errors, the improved satisfaction of patients and a lowering of costs in providing care.

In order to assure that the changes in these four areas were ‘real’ the team only used literature that had both pre-assessments and post-assessments to see if there were statistically significant changes in the four areas.

Using this assessment rubric the team was able to answer the three questions that it posited. First, team training in healthcare is effective. Healthcare team training closely matches training in other industries and service organizations.

Secondly, training is effective, surprisingly, regardless of training design and implementation, trainee characteristics and characteristics of the work environment. The use of multiple learning strategies versus a single training strategy does not matter. Simulations of a work environment are not necessary. Training can occur in a standard classroom.

Training is effective for all staff members regardless of certification. Training of all clinical personnel as well as administrative staff is effective. Team training also is effective across all care settings.

Lastly, the team’s meta-analysis shows that within the Kirkpatrick rubric team training is effective in producing the organizational goals of better care at lower costs with higher patient satisfaction. In the rubric trainee reactions are not nearly as important as learning and transfer in producing results. It is important that trainers use both pre-training assessments and post-training assessments to measure whether there learning of skills, knowledge and abilities were learned and whether these were transferred to the work site. Effectiveness of training should always be assessed in order that training programs can be consistently improved.

In my September 2017 newsletter “Team Meetings” I described the elements of good team training as well as provided a link to the American Medical Associations team training module as part of Stepsforward series of learning modules. You can find this newsletter online here. With these training instructions as a beginning healthcare providers can learn to work more effectively as teams and thus produce better care at a lower cost with higher satisfaction of both patients and providers.